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Center for Economic Development and Business Research
W. Frank Barton School of Business

1845 Fairmount, Devlin Hall
Wichita, KS 67260-0121
Phone: (316) 978-3225 
Fax: (316) 978-3950
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Wichita in Megapolitan America: An Analysis of Wichita's Potential Export Markets

 

exportsregional

 

The Center for Economic Development and Business Research, part of Wichita State University's W. Frank Barton School of Business, has completed a study of the regional export potential Wichita has to the surrounding areas.

 

"For long-term economic viability, there is an increasing need for Wichita's economy to be linked to surrounding metropolitan areas," said WSU President John Bardo. "This study is an important resource to encourage these relationships and provide greater growth opportunities for the South Central Kansas economy."

 

The project investigated the potential export markets for intermediate goods in eight major nearby metropolitan areas: Denver, Kansas City, St. Louis, Oklahoma City, Tulsa, Dallas, Houston, and San Antonio. Wichita has a diverse set of goods-producing sectors that are in demand as inputs to these nearby metropolitan areas, and two sectors in Wichita that are demanded consistently across metropolitan regions are the coating and engraving sector and the machine shop sector.

 

Wichita can potentially supply a variety of additional goods to each of the metropolitan and megapolitan areas discussed in this report. The markets with the most diverse demands from Wichita are Houston and Tulsa, each with eight different sectors potentially demanding Wichita inputs from its top ten most concentrated industries.

 

Read the complete report.

 

 
 
 

CEDBR Will Be Moving, Twice

CEDBR will be moving, first to NIAR, and then to Old Town

The Center for Economic Development and Business Research is preparing for a temporary relocation, prior to our 2017 move to Wichita State University’s Old Town location.

Beginning April 14, 2015, we will be located on the third floor of the National Institute for Aviation Research. We will remain in the NIAR building until our move into the Old Town Location in 2017.

View a map showing our new location and parking options.

Read more about our eventual move to Old Town.

Upcoming Event Discussing the Aging Workforce in Manufacturing

The Center for Economic Development and Business Research, part of the W. Frank Barton School of Business at Wichita State University, and the Wichita Manufacturer’s Association are partnering in organizing the first Wichita Industry Research Exchange (WIRE).

The spring event will feature presenter Dr. Masud Chand, assistant professor of international business, sharing the results of his research on the aging workforce among manufacturing economies. The presentation will be followed by highlights from a survey conducted by CEDBR among WMA members and a panel discussion that will include participants from several professional backgrounds.

The event will take place on Wednesday, May 6, 2015 from 8:30 am to 10:30 AM in room 180 of the Hughes Metropolitan Complex. The event is free and will include refreshments.Please register at www.WIRE.cedbr.org.

High-Level Engineering Skills for Aviation Manufacturing Communities

In the modern businessworld, having a highly skilled workforce has become increasingly important to economic success.  The Center for Economic Development and Business Research (CEDBR), with funding from the Greater Wichita Economic Development Coalition, recently conducted a study to estimate the skill levels of engineering occupations in ten aviation manufacturing MSAs, including Wichita.

Among these ten MSAs, Wichita is the only metropolitan area with engineers who rank in the top 5 in every skill and knowledge category selected.Wichita has the highest average ranking of the ten MSAs; Seattle and Savannah had the second and third highest average rankings, respectively.  Tulsa had the lowest average ranking of the ten MSAs

Read more.

Kansas Unemployment Rate Took a Dip from January to February

The unemployment rate for Kansas, as a whole, decreased 0.1 percentage point from January 2015 to February 2015. All of the Kansas MSAs experienced decreases, also, with a drop of 0.2 percentage point in the Wichita, Topeka and Lawrence MSAs, and a 0.4 percentage point drop in the Manhattan MSA.

A slide presentation is available with additional employment and unemployment data for Kansas and its four metro areas.

View the slide presentation.

Profile of Unemployment Insurance Beneficiaries in Wichita, 4th Quarter 2014

unemployment beneficiaries in KansasThere was an average of 14,085 unemployed people in the Wichita metropolitan area in the fourth quarter of 2014, approximately 65 percent of whom collected unemployment insurance benefits. In the fourth quarter of 2014 there were approximately 9,093 people, age 16 and over, who collected unemployment insurance benefits. That is an increase of approximately 13 percent from the third quarter.

Read the full report on the demographic profile of Wichita unemployment insurance beneficiaries. 

In the fourth quarter of 2014, four industries accounted for 67.4 percent of unemployment insurance beneficiaries in the Wichita area; manufacturing, administrative and support and waste management and remediation services, wholesale trade, and construction. Only three industries had significant increases in the number of beneficiaries; construction, wholesale trade, and administrative and support and waste management and remidation services.    

Read the full report on the industry profile of Wichita unemployment insurance beneficiaries. 

Producer Price Index Shows Several Dropping Prices Over Past Year

Inflation and Producer Price IndexThe Consumer Price Index is used to calculate inflation, or the change in price of a basket of goods and services, as it impacts consumers; whereas, the Producer Price Index measures changes in selling prices, thereby expressing price changes from the perspective of the seller who produces a particular commodity.

A slide presentation updated with February 2015 data shows the Midwest inflation rate decreased in both urban metros and non-metro urban areas from January to February.

The Producer Price Index data shows that prices in the United States have increased from February 2014 to February 2015 for aircraft (1.7 percent) and slaughter livestock (2.7 percent). During that same time period, prices decreased for crude petroleum (53.4 percent), natural gas (52.8 percent), sorghum (9.7 percent) and wheat (12.6 percent). 

View the slide presentation.

Decrease in Misery Index for 2014, 4th Quarter

Decrease in MiseryBetween the third and fourth quarters of 2014 the general level of misery experienced by people in the United States decreased. This can be attributed to the general improvement in both housing prices and the unemployment rate. The level of economic misery experienced by Kansans is lower than in the United States as a whole, and decreased by more than the United States in the fourth quarter.

The Misery Index, as calculated by the Center for Economic Development and Business Research (CEDBR), includes the following components:

  • The Consumer Price Index (CPI) from the Bureau of Labor Statistics
  • The House Price Index (HPI) from the Federal Housing Finance Agency
  • Unemployment Rates (UR) from the Bureau of Labor Statistics

Read the complete third quarter report.

Concentration of Veterinarian Occupations in Wichita is Above National Average

veterinarian occupations

Veterinary employment in the Wichita metropolitan area accounts for a small fraction of the local labor force, approximately 590 workers.  However, they provide valuable services to the community.

In the Wichita metropolitan area, employment in veterinary occupations has grown significantly between 2008 and 2013. The concentration of these occupations in the Wichita area is well above the national average.

Nationally, the number of veterinarians has grown by 13.4 percent between 2008 and 2013 and is projected to grow 12 percent from 2012 to 2022. The number of veterinary assistants has grown by 1.7 percent between 2008 and 2013 and is projected to grow 10 percent from 2012 to 2022.

Read more.

2015 Wichita Economic Outlook, January Revision

 

January 05, 2015

In 2015, Wichita total nonfarm employment is expected to increase by 4,228 jobs, which implies the employment growth rate is anticipated to be 1.5 percent.

The service (2,686) and production (700) sectors are expected to lead the growth in Wichita in 2015, with growth rates of 2 percent and 1.1 percent, respectively. The trade, transportation, and utilities sector is projected to add 710 jobs and the government sector is expected to add approximately 100 new jobs, growing at 0.3 percent.

Read the full 2015 Wichita Employment Forecast.

 

2015 Kansas Economic Outlook, January Revision

January 05, 2015

In 2015, Kansas total nonfarm employment is expected to increase by 24,691 jobs, which implies the employment growth rate is anticipated to be 1.8 percent.

Both the service (17,614 jobs) and production (4,088 jobs) sectors are expected to lead the growth in the state in 2015, with growth rates of 2.8 percent and 1.8 percent, respectively.  The trade, transportation, and utilities sector is projected to add 2,785 jobs, for 1.1 percent growth.  Whereas, the government sector is project to grow by only 0.1 percent, adding only 204 jobs in 2015.

Read the full 2015 Kansas Employment Forecast.